Research Article

Ipratropium induced bronchoconstriction in a young Asthmatic: A case report

H Aleshaa*, J Collindridge and RK Singh

Published: 02/23/2021 | Volume 5 - Issue 1 | Pages: 007-008

Acute severe Asthma is a common paediatric emergency managed according to the BTS and SIGN guidelines. They recommend that if initial β2 agonist treatment bears no response, frequent Ipratropium Bromide doses can be given every 20-30 minutes [1]. We present a case of paradoxical bronchospasm to Ipratropium, an observed but rare side effect.

Read Full Article HTML DOI: 10.29328/journal.acr.1001046 Cite this Article

References

  1. British Thoracic Society and Scottish intercollegiate guidelines Network. British guideline on the management of asthma. Thorax . 2008; 63 Suppl 4: 1-121. PubMed: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/18463203/
  2. Baeza-Trinidad R, Mosquera-Lozano JD. Acute coronary syndrome secondary to paradoxical bronchospasm due to nebulized ipratropium bromide. Clin Case Rep Rev. 2017.
  3. Magee JS, Pittman LM, Jette-Kelly LA. Paradoxical Bronchoconstriction with Short-Acting Beta Agonist. Am J Case Rep. 2018; 19: 1204-1207. PubMed: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30297688/
  4. Mutlu GM, Moonjelly E, Chan L, Olopade CO. Laryngospasm and paradoxical bronchoconstriction after repeated doses of ?2-agonists containing edetate disodium. Mayo Clin Proc. 2000; 75: 285-287. PubMed: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/10725956/
  5. Jayaraman D, Brar K. A Case of ipratropium bromide allergy in a patient with severe persistent asthma. Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. 2016.
  6. Committtee J. formulary. British national formulary for children. BMJ Publishing and the Royal Pharmaceutical Society. 2020.
  7. BCD. Atrovent® 250 UDVs®, 1 ml (Ipratropium bromide). 2020. www.medicines.org.uk/emc/product/3818/smpc