Research Article

Trichomonas Vaginalis-A Clinical Image

Astrit M Gashi*

Published: 07/21/2017 | Volume 1 - Issue 1 | Pages: 001-002

Case Report

A 32-year-old G4P301LC3 woman presents to the office for a visit, with a 6-day history of vaginal discharge with an unpleasant odor. On speculum examination, the discharge was green in color and frothy in appearance. Is noticed vulvar erythema, edema, and pruritus, also is noted the characteristic erythematous, punctate epithelial papillae or “strawberry” appearance of the cervix.Vaginal pH was 6.2. Diagnosis of Trichomonas vaginalis is made via wet prep microscopic examination of vaginal swabs.But also, for diagnosis help even the exam with the speculum, concretely “strawberry” appearance of the cervix. The diagnosis is confirmed by culture.Trichomoniasis is a sexually transmitted infection [1,2], that caused by trichomonas vaginalis. Trichomonas vaginalis is a unicellular, anaerobic flagellated protozoan, that inhabits the lower genitourinary tracts of women and men, but that can cause vaginitis. Clinical findings of Trichomonas vaginalis include a profuse discharge with an unpleasant odor. The discharge may be yellow, gray, or green in color and may be frothy in appearance. Vaginal pH is in the 6 to 7.Vulvar erythema, edema, and pruritus can also be noted. The characteristic erythematous, punctate epithelial papillae or “strawberry” appearance of the cervix is apparent in only 10% of cases. Symptoms are usually worse immediately after menses because of the transient increase in vaginal pH at that time. Diagnosis of Trichomonas vaginalis is made via wet prep microscopic examination of vaginal swabs.

Read Full Article HTML DOI: 10.29328/journal.hjcr.1001001 Cite this Article

References

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